Tag Archives: Tennessee

Busy Season Begins!

The busy season begins with April as we ramp up soap production in preparation for summer at the Franklin Farmers Market. Not to mention milking every morning and latching the kids at night. It’s always a fun challenge to keep up with the extra goat care, yard work and soap inventory that Spring brings.

Nate’s Notes April 2018

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
1
54° and mostly cloudy today. We latched the kids last night, in their own stall, so the moms had a lot of milk to give this morning. Now that they are over two weeks old, we will do that every night. In the day, they are all together.
2
48 ° and partly sunny this morning. I am cranking out as much soap as I can now that the milk is flowing again and the busy season is approaching. Made 8 batches: 2 Lavender, 2 Oats 'n Honey, 2 Sandalwood, 2 Almond.
3
72° and a little cloudy.
Goats are looking good. I have been brushing them in the morning so their new coats can come in.
4
46° and sunny. Much chillier than yesterday. Our friend Beth and her son Solomon came from Atlanta to meet the new baby goats.
5
52° when I went out to milk this morning. Gucci and Miranda have been sparring. They both broke off a scur and are bleeding all over. No danger though. They are just messy.
6
Took our guests to Zanders, in Dickson, for wood-fired pizza. Before they went back to Atlanta. Solomon also went with me to the Co-Op and by Vanessa's work to pick up a tiller. It's time to clean the barn again. My favorite thing (not).
7
Market today. It was super cold and windy for this time of year though, so lots of people stayed home. Makes me appreciate the regulars even more, who come out on cold days like this.
8
40° and partly sunny. Went to Nashville to see Frank (Vanessa's dad) and hang out with family at Nanny's house. She lives in East Nashville. Very hip.
9
50's° and sunny. Getting warmer. Have a vulture that keeps trying to land in the goat field. Paris is having none of that. She barks at them, even when they are just flying over the farm. It gives her something to do in the daytime.
10
57° this morning. The grass is coming up good now, because of the warmer weather. Daisy is getting "jelly neck" from grazing with her head down all day. The fluid builds up in her face and makes her neck swell. I will keep my eye on it, to make sure its not bottle jaw (caused from barber poll worms).
11
Sleeping with the windows open these days. Its nice. Diamond got stuck between the fence and a closed gate. This is why when people ask, "What do goats do in the wild?" I say, "They die."
12
It was 75° at 6am. Beautiful day. First I milked the goats. Next I made Bonsai, Nag Champa and Pipe Tobacco soap. Then I fixed our tax problem... don't ask!
13
Another beautiful day. Played with the goats a bunch this morning. The big girls can't stop eating the new grass that's coming up.
14
Market today. It rained like crazy. I still sold some soap, however. Sandalwood is one of my best sellers lately.
15
38° and overcast this morning. Stopped raining. Vanessa left the hose on yesterday morning. I noticed it was running when I went out to milk. The water trough is the cleanest its ever been. Can't wait to see our bill.
16
35° and cloudy. Got two big orders today. One from Nashville; the other from our old neighborhood store in Atlanta. It's called Candler Park Market. Vanessa and I met for the first time right next to that place, back in the day.
17
50° and sunny! Starting to feel like Spring again. Made soap, Bay Rum and Egyptian Musk. Magic is still giving the most milk. Its not a contest though.
18
43° windy. Saw some toads having babies in our driveway puddle. So much drama out here.
19
40° or so. I didn't check. Found a lizard in the hay, a little brown one. The baby goats are getting big fast. I have to make a noise when I pick them up now.
20
48° and sunny. Barn cleaning day. Not the best job on this farm. Later we took a nature walk over in Bon Aqua at the John Noel Natural Area. Saw lots of super old trees and wildflowers.
21
55° Market today. Had great sales. Godiva cut her leg pretty bad on something. We had to get a bandage wrapped around it quick. I don't have sutures.
22
46° Rain. Godiva's leg has stopped bleeding. Keeping it clean is the tough part now.
23
55° Overcast. Godiva's leg is healing nicely. She knows we are helping so she just stands there while we doctor her up.
24
53° Rainy. Making tons of soap these days. Today's line up was Peaches 'n Cream, Almond, Cranberry Woods, and Sea Salt. Plus Rosemary Mint and Unscented lotion.
25
55° Looked like rain all day, but it never did. Found a little brown snake in the hay; a blue tailed lizard too. They must have been having a meeting.
58° Rain. Took the bandage off Godiva's leg today. Looks like she is healing pretty good. No limping. Made lots of soap: Beach Bum, Barber Shop, Mountain Heather, Lemongrass and Bonsai.27
Saw a box turtle this morning. He was in the boys' field. Vanessa and I trimmed around the trees and along the driveway. It is a messy business, running the weed-eaters. Probably got poison ivy in the process.
28
High of 72°. Went to the Franklin Farmers Market today. Had really good crowd and sold a lot. Need to make more body powder now.
29
It was in the 50°'s this morning. Did some work in the yard (after milking and feeding). Patched some holes in the fence. The little ones were getting out a lot. No more!
30
Very warm, up to 79° and sunny. The grass is really coming up. Goats are eating less hay now. Made 8 batches of soap. trying to catch up.

Kidding Season

Kidding SeasonIt’s kidding season on Tottys Bend Soap Farm which means spring is just around the corner and new baby goats are bouncing around in our field. Kidding season is exciting and there are many things to anticipate. Will the deliveries go well? Will everyone be strong and healthy? Are we going to have to get up in the middle of the night and assist with a difficult birth in freezing cold weather? These are all things we worry about during kidding season. But so far so good! Our first two does have had successful and relatively stress free deliveries, blessing us with two girls and two boys. Our does will continue kidding from now until the end of May. When our last doe has kidded we will have between six and twelve new baby goats on our farm. Baby goats are just about the most adorable things you will ever see! The cuteness overload of kidding season makes up for all the worrying we do this time of year.

We kicked off kidding season with the birth of two beautiful does, Godiva and Gucci. Godiva was the first born and is the more outgoing of the two. She is brown with white ears. Gucci was born within minutes of her twin sister. She is the first solid white goat kid to be born on our farm. Gucci is a little shy. Daisy is their momma. Daisy is four years old and is an experienced momma. She gave birth on a Saturday afternoon while I was at home and Nate was at the Franklin Farmers Market. We knew Daisy’s due date was near so we were keeping a close eye on her. You can determine a goat’s due date by counting 150 days on your calendar from the time of their breeding or you can use an online due date calculator programmed for goats, assuming you know the exact date of the breeding.

Gucci & N8On our first day of kidding season Daisy ate grain for breakfast and then went out with the herd to nibble on some grass until about noon. That is when I saw her go into the barn by herself. Goats rarely leave the rest of the herd so I knew this was a sign that the babies were on their way! I went to the barn to keep her company and to make sure she didn’t need any help. I sat with Daisy for a couple of hours as her contractions came and went. Soon the contractions were getting pretty close together. She stretched and yawned, pawed at the floor, and began to push when the time finally arrived. Both of Daisy’s does were born in the diving position which is one foot in front, then the face and then the other foot. This is the ideal position because it allows their head and shoulders to pass through the birth canal easily. I was relieved because I didn’t have to reach in and reposition either of her kids which can be very stressful for everyone. As the babies were born I picked them up one at a time and placed each one in front of Daisy so that she could clean them off. This is an important part of the bonding process for momma and baby goats. They learn how each other smells and this will be how they recognize one another. Within ten minutes both babies were standing and walking. Soon they found their momma’s teats and had their first taste of colostrum. I was extremely proud of Daisy for bringing us two healthy, beautiful does. When she was ready I gave her a treat of warm water with molasses and a big basket of hay. She and her new babies stayed in their special stall for a couple of days until it was Windy’s turn to kid.

RockyWindy is two years old. This is her first kidding season. We anxiously anticipated the arrival of her babies because Windy is very shy and does not like to be handled by people. It is always hard to predict how new mommas will react to their first babies, and to us if we need to help. Sometimes new moms get confused and do not want to accept their babies at first. When the time came Windy delivered two bucklings, who we named Rocky and Jimbo. Her baby boys were delivered in the diving position without any complications. It took Windy a few minutes to get warmed up to her new babies but soon her instincts kicked in and she began to clean them off. This was a relief. The next step was to get the boys to eat. This task was more of a challenge because Windy’s udder was very small and the boys couldn’t find her teats on their own. We had to help. Helping newborn goats eat for the first time is extremely tedious! They are clueless and will nibble on just about everything except for the teat that you are desperately trying to place in their tiny mouths. Eventually each of Windy’s new bucklings had a taste of her colostrum and we knew Windy had bonded with them. It took a couple more days for Windy’s udder to fill with milk. In the mean time we supplemented Rocky and Jimbo’s diet with goat kid formula which we fed them from a bottle. Rocky was the first born and was a little bigger than Jimbo. He seemed to be getting enough from his momma and wasn’t very interested in the bottle. But little Jimbo happily took his bottles until Windy had enough for both baby boys. We are still keeping an eye on the boys to make sure they are getting enough to eat and growing like they should. We are also supplementing Windy’s afternoon grain with a top dressing called Mo’ Milk. This supplement is formulated to increase milk production. We haven’t used it before so we are interested to see how it works.

Now the babies are a couple of weeks old and they are running, playing and getting into everything. One of their favorite games is chasing each other around the oak tree. This is the time during kidding season when we are the happiest and most proud because we know our goat herd is healthy and their offspring are starting their little lives off on the right foot.

Fall Leaves

autumnleavesHere in Duck River, Tennessee, we are having one of the most beautiful displays of fall leaves I can remember. The view from our back deck is a kaleidoscope of color. The oaks are showing their deep red, leathery foliage. The thin, crisp fall leaves of the maples turn bright yellow and orange while the poplars and sweet gums are covered in magnificent golden yellow fall leaves. Even the fiery red leaves of the sumacs add touch of beauty to this year’s fall splendor. The peak time to see fall leaves in Tennessee usually begins in mid to late October in East Tennessee, reaches into Middle Tennessee in early November, and spreads to West Tennessee by mid to late November.

Fall Leaves 1While we are enjoying the scenic views this autumn, our goats are loving it because fall leaves are a prized treat. They spend hours each day hoovering up as many leaves as possible. Dried hardwood leaves are a wonderful source of nutrition for goats because they are loaded with many deep-earth minerals like carbon, calcium, silicon, potassium, and trace elements. However, some fall leaves are toxic to goats, especially wilted cherry and azalea leaves. Even a small amount of these poisonous plants can be fatal to goats. Luckily we do not have any azalea bushes and the few cherry trees on our property are out of range. The most abundant hardwoods growing in and around our pasture are white and red oaks, silver maples, hickories, sweet gums, and poplars. We also have a few pines and cedars which make good winter snacks for our herd. It would be awesome if we could rely on our goats to keep the fall leaves from piling up in our front yard. But unfortunately our goats can’t keep up with the huge amount of leaves that fall in our yard each autumn.

Wet Goats 1If it rains on the fallen leaves, the goats refuse to eat them. Contrary to popular lore goats are picky little creatures, as they should be. Too much water in their diet can cause them to become bloated, which is a dangerous condition that can result in death. We’ve had quite a bit of rain lately and there’s nothing our goats hate more than getting wet. They don’t seem to mind the fog or misty fall mornings but as soon as a single drop of real rain hits the ground the entire herd heads for the barn as fast as possible. They will camp out in the barn all day long if it is raining. As soon as the rain stops the goats will come outside again but they will not eat soggy hay nor will they eat the wet fall leaves.

Autumn TreesSoon the fall leaves will be gone, or at least they will have all fallen. Chances are that a good bit of them will stay piled in our gutters and on our “lawn” (a term I use loosely) until spring. We tend to procrastinate when it comes to yard work, especially raking leaves. Right now there are leaves on our roof, on the front porch and the back deck. There are leaves covering the tops of our boxwoods and piled all along our walkway. There are leaves practically everywhere you look. But around here there is always something more important to do than raking leaves, like making a batch of goat milk soap, playing with the baby goats, milking the mamma goats, or enjoying an afternoon view of the autumn trees.

Our Goat Zelda Died

Sadly our goat Zelda died a few days after my last blog about her. The hot, wet weather we had in Tennessee this summer only made the situation worse for poor Zelda. We tried everything we could think of to keep her going but in the end she was just not strong enough to make a recovery.

Zelda was born on our farm in 2012. She was a single doe kid out of Trudy and Blaze. Her mother Trudy, was our favorite goat and was the number one doe in our herd for many years. No doubt with time Zelda would have preceded Trudy as the Herd Matriarch. During her short life Zelda blessed us with three doelings. The first one, Beatrice, is just over a year old now. At her death Zelda left us with 8 week old twin does to care for. We call these girls the “Nuts”. One is named Hazel Nut and the other is Honey Nut.

Our Goat Zelda DiedFortunately our new goat Daisy has graciously adopted the Nuts. They graze with her and find comfort in cuddling with her during loafing hours when all the goats lounge around chewing their cud. Daisy is very attentive to the Nuts and keeps an eye out for them most of the time. Our goat Magic also seems to take an interest in the little orphans. She doesn’t feed them like Daisy does but she likes to babysit every now and then.

It will be interesting to see how the rest of the herd reacts to the gap Zelda left in the group and to Daisy’s decision to take on her legacy. Who will the next Matriarch be? Where will Daisy fit into the pecking order? Will the Nuts inherit their birth mother’s ranking or will they be left on the fringes? Will Magic’s kindness to Zelda’s kids improve her status in the herd? All this will unfold in the months to come as the herd responds to the loss of a sister, mother, auntie and friend.

Our New Goat Daisy is Helping Out

New GoatOur new goat, Miss Daisy, is being a foster mom to Zelda’s twin baby does. We bought Daisy a couple of weeks ago from our friend Bridget. Daisy is originally from South Dakota but she has been a Tennessee girl since she was just a few months old. We are happy to have her as the newest addition to our little goat farm. Thankfully our new goat, Daisy, is a great milker and we have been able to put Zelda’s babies on her for their morning breakfast ever since Zelda got sick.

Zelda hasn’t improved very much since yesterday’s post. She is still grinding her teeth and turning away from everything we offer her to eat and drink. She did like her nutrient drench with extra iron. We are going to try to build her iron back up because the worms have caused her to become very anemic. We gave her an injection of iron in addition to the drench. She is still enjoying her fan and I keep her water fresh and cool for when she is ready to have a drink. If we do not see her drink on her own we will have to syringe it into her mouth to keep her hydrated. She will not get up by herself either but she is able to stand for a few minutes if we help her get on her feet. It is a very touch and go situation and it is hard on all of us emotionally. It is hard not to get discouraged.

Daisy, the new goat, is a bright spot for us during this difficult time. No matter what the outcome is for Zelda, we know Daisy will take care of Zelda’s baby does. Zelda’s doelings still know and love Zelda as their mother but they are no longer dependent on her for milk. That has given Zelda much needed time and energy to focus on getting healthy again. Miss Daisy couldn’t have joined us at a more critical time. We are grateful for her smiling face and all the nutritious milk she provides.

We Have a Sick Goat

Sick GoatWe’ve been nursing a sick goat for a week now. Poor Zelda has been in the barn, away from her other goat friends and her baby goats, trying to bounce back from a bad case of worms. Despite our routine of checking the herd for early signs of parasites, Zelda seems to be suffering from an overload of what are commonly called barber pole worms. Here in Duck River, Tennessee, July has brought a mixture of humid, rainy, and extremely hot days. This type of weather can be tough on dairy goats in our area because it creates the perfect condition for barber pole worms to proliferate. These tiny beasts get into the guts of their hosts and rob them of nutrients, causing anemia and many other complications. Usually proper goat management can prevent sickness but sometimes problems arise as a result of worm overload. That is the case with Zelda.

We were surprised and concerned when Zelda didn’t go to the feeding bins last Sunday. Instead she stayed in the barn away from the rest of the herd. Zelda is our largest and greediest goat of all so we immediately knew she was a sick goat. She seemed depressed and was grinding her teeth, which is a common symptom of pain. Nate checked the color of her bottom eyelids. If a sick goat has worms, her eyelids will be pale pink or whitish instead of a deep reddish-pink. Sure enough, Zelda had pale eyelids.

We gave her a dose of de-wormer right away. She’s also been having symptoms of acidosis, a condition, that could have been caused by the worm infestation, and which caused the ph of her rumen to become unbalanced. To combat this problem and hopefully prevent further complications, we’ve been giving her regular doses of baking soda, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medication, probiotics, vitamin b, fluids, and a nutrient drench.

Right now, our biggest battle is to lift her spirits. Attention and pampering are critical to a sick goat. We bought some all natural fly repellant that really seems to keep the flies from bothering her. I also plugged in a small fan so she has a nice breeze. She loves her fan!!! Companionship is also critical to a sick goat. Goats really need the company of their buddies or they will sink into depression. A depressed, sick goat has a much harder time bouncing back. Depression can cause them to give up on eating and they will lose their drive to survive. To lift Zelda’s spirits, I’ve been spending time with her and giving her treats every hour. She’s slowly beginning to eat fresh leaves and will even eat some hay every now and then. She likes her Tums which help calm her belly and taste good. She also likes her baking soda. Lately, I’ve been giving her raw goat milk yogurt too. She really likes it! It has good bacteria in it and lots of protein. She had made a lot of progress as of yesterday but today, she seems sad and doesn’t want to eat much, not even her treats!

Zelda is a sick goat. Please send some good thoughts her way. She needs lost and lots of positive energy and love. We are not giving up on Zelda, even if she’s a greedy pig, hahaha. Her babies need her and the rest of the herd misses her too. Hopefully, with enough TLC we can get her on her feet again.

Join us on the Arts & Ag Tour!

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Graphics by Nicole Lewis

We are so excited about the Arts & Ag Tour which is coming up May 22nd -May 23rd. The Arts & Ag Tour has become a Memorial Day weekend tradition in Hickman County, Tennessee. This special event is a two day, self-guided tour of Hickman County’s scenic back roads with over 24 stops along the way. Each stop features a combination of farming, art, music and southern hospitality. Taking the Arts & Ag Tour is completely free! You can pick up a free copy of the beautiful, full-color Arts & Ag Tour Guide at Wild Duck Soup Emporium on the Centerville Square or download the digital version from the Arts & Ag Tour website.

Arts and Ag Tour-1Tottys Bend Soap Farm is going to be Stop #11 on the Tour. Visitors will be able to tour our small farm where we raise registered Nubian dairy goats. Our milk parlor will be open for visitors to see where Nate hand milks our goats each morning. Folks will learn all about our sustainable farming methods and how we make small batches of handmade goat milk soaps using milk from our own goats. Our friend Miss Pam will be at our farm to offer hands-on goat milking demonstrations. She will also have a booth with her Star Brite soaps for sale.

Just a short ways up from us on Tottys Bend Road are two more stops on the Arts & Ag Tour. Stop #12 is the Tottys Bend Community Center. This historic building once served as the community schoolhouse. It is also said to be the location of the longest running regular potluck in the United States. Members of the Tottys Bend Community Center have been gathering for a potluck dinner on the second Tuesday of the month for over 40 years. Their monthly potluck is open to non-members as well. During the Arts & Ag Tour visitors to the Tottys Bend Community Center can learn about the history of the building and its members. Light refreshments will be served. Tottys Bend Community cookbooks will be for sale with proceeds benefiting the upkeep of the building.

Arts & Ag Tour signDuck River Rose is Stop #13 on the Arts & Ag Tour. This scenic rose farm is also located on Tottys Bend Road. Owners Larry and Connie Baird are award winning rosarians. They cultivate over 400 rose plants in addition to many other plant varieties. Visitors to Duck River Rose will enjoy a tour of the gardens which overlook the Duck River. Larry and Connie are happy to share information about rose care and how they became interested in roses. Larry will have his handmade garden stepping stones for sale.

The entire Arts & Ag Tour is a family friendly event. There will be a ton of arts and crafts for sale throughout the Tour as well as local, chemical-free produce, farm eggs, grass fed meats, and southern style plate lunches. We look forward to meeting new folks on the Arts & Ag Tour and hope many of you are able to take advantage of this once a year experience.

Moms Love Our Rose Soap

Rose Soap

Our Duck River Rose soap is one of the very first scented soaps we made and it continues to be a favorite with our customers, especially this time of year. Here in Tennessee, we had an abundance of rain this April and just like the saying goes, May flowers are now in full bloom. The delicate scent of spring blooming roses is captivating and has become a symbol of love and beauty. Those qualities are what inspired us to create our very own rose soap. It took experimenting with several rose fragrances until we hit on just the right true rose scent for our Duck River Rose soap.

IMG_3426In addition to a true rose scent our Duck River Rose soap is infused with an all-natural rose clay. This clay is what gives our rose soap its rosy color. The clay we use in our rose soap gently draws out impurities in the skin which makes our rose soap a good facial bar. The clay also creates a richer lather with smaller bubbles which makes Duck Diver Rose soap good for shaving too!

Our rose soap got its name, Duck River Rose, from our neighbors Larry and Connie Baird who are award winning rosarians. They have a rose farm, with a view of the Duck River, a few miles from us on Tottys Bend Road where they cultivate over four hundred rose plants. You can tour their rose farm this May 22nd and 23rd during the Arts & Ag Tour. Our farm will also be open to visitors taking the Arts & Ag Tour. The tour is a free, self-guided event on the back roads of Hickman County, Tennessee. Stops on the Arts & Ag Tour will feature farms, art, and music as well as southern style food and hospitality. You can visit the Arts & Ag Tour website for more information.

Duck River RoseOur Duck River Rose soap is as classic, and classy, as it gets. Imagine how the fresh spring air smells at Larry and Connie’s rose garden and you will have an idea of what this special rose soap smells like. Duck River Rose soap makes a great gift for anyone who enjoys true old fashioned scents with vintage style. We also make Duck River Rose body powder and Duck River Rose goat milk lotion. We make our rose soap and all the rest of our goat milk skin care products right on our farm in Duck River, Tennessee. Nate hand milks our small herd of dairy goats each morning. He weighs the milk and freezes it to use in every batch of our goat milk soaps. We pamper our goats so our customers can pamper their skin with our goat milk skin care products.

Visit us at the Franklin Farmers Market

Franklin Farmers Market

The Franklin Farmers Market is a special place where farmers and artisans from Middle Tennessee gather each Saturday to meet our customers and sell our wares. It is a producers only market which means that everything at market is grown or made in Middle Tennessee by the market vendors. We have a booth at the Franklin Farmers Market where we sell our handmade goat milk soaps. We have been part of the Franklin Farmers Market for over four years. It is a wonderful venue with a loyal following of customers who come out every week to support their local farmers and to purchase fresh, local foods and handmade wares. The Franklin Farmers Market summer season begins this Saturday at 8:00am and we are so excited to be there again!

We look forward to Saturdays at the Franklin Farmers Market because that is where we do our socializing and shopping for the week. This time of year we are able to get fresh strawberries, tender salad greens, farm eggs, goat cheese, local milk, meats and seasonal veggies. We have fun catching up with many friends we’ve met at the market. Some of our friends are fellow farmers like the Lingo family from Beaverdam Creek Farm who grow and sell chemical-free produce, organic corn grits and grass fed beef. We also have friends from the Franklin Farmers Market who are artists like Rockin’ Robbin. Robbin creates handmade jewelry that is inspired by her Texas roots. She also sells vintage cowboy boots!

Last year we enjoyed a fantastic summer season at our booth which was in the parking lot just outside the main shed. But this year we are happy to announce we will be in a new location beginning this coming Saturday. We are expanding our space at the Franklin Farmers Market and will be in two booths, side by side. The extra space will give our customers more room to browse, and to take their time smelling and looking at our large selection of goat milk soaps, lotions, body powder, shaving soaps, and lip balms. It will also give our customers room to stand while we process their credit cards. We are thrilled to run credit and debit cards at the Franklin Farmers Market, right on our cell phones. Being able to accept credit and debit cards makes shopping so much more convenient for our customers.

If you’ve visited us at the Franklin Farmers Market before please remember you won’t find us in our usual summer location. This year we will be in a 20 foot wide, white tent at the far end of the shed next to ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Rocky Glade Farm and Sue’s Flowers. Please stop by and see us if you are in the area. We love meeting our customers and making new friends at the Franklin Farmers market!

Milking Goats on Tottys Bend Soap Farm

Milking Goats-1Milking Goats is a part of every morning on Tottys Bend Soap Farm. We use milk from our own goats in each batch of our goat milk soaps. Our season of milking goats begins when the first kids are born, which is usually in January, and goes until late fall which is the beginning of breeding season. Making milk requires a lot of protein and the proper combination of vitamins and minerals. That is why when we are milking goats we supplement their intake with a special diet that contains everything they need to produce high quality, fresh goat milk. Our goats also graze and browse outside on pasture all day, every day. The nutrients in their diet is what makes the milk we use in our goat milk soaps so good for dry, sensitive skin.

Of course the female goats are the milk producers. They are called does. Their milk comes in each year when their babies are born. They will produce milk for about nine months. Young females are called doelings. From the time they are babies we handle our doelings every day and prepare them to be good milkers. They learn to follow us from the barn to the milk parlor. They learn to get on the milk stand and to let us handle them. Our goats learn that milking is a time when they get special food and lots of attention which are two of their favorite things. Most of them learn to be patient while we do the milking which usually takes about ten minutes per doe.  Each doe produces about half a gallon of milk at each milking. They are always happy to go back to the rest of the herd when their turn is over (and their food is all gone).

This short movie is about milking goats on Tottys Bend Soap Farm. Watch and you will see how our goats literally run to the milk room for their turn to be milked. You will also see the milking process, which is all done by hand, and some of the special equipment we use.

We make hand made goat milk soap on our dairy goat farm in Duck River, Tennessee. Our soap is made in small batches with milk provided by our own goats. We sell our goat milk soaps in Tennessee at the Franklin Farmers Market every Saturday. Come see us if you are in town!